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We are not aware of any evidence to suggest that turmeric should be cooked or heated for its active components to be absorbed and utilized by the body. However, some research does suggest that it may be important to eat turmeric with some fat for …
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The World’s Healthiest Foods

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Is the heat of Summer bringing you down? I mean, way down? So down that you can’t even get off the floor? Well, we’re here to tell you that heat-induced laziness is no reason to skip a workout. We created a 10-minute workout perfect for the overly sultry days of August. You might be surprised how much you work your muscles sitting down! Grab a light set of weights, and lie down for your next workout.

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POPSUGAR Fitness

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Kale is among a small number of foods that contain measurable amounts of oxalates, naturally occurring substances found in plants, animals, and human beings. When oxalates become too concentrated in body fluids, they can crystallize and cause health …
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The World’s Healthiest Foods

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Government report shows more cases among adults,

About 20 percent who don’t have immediate procedure return to ER within month, researchers say


WebMD Health

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Smoothies are a refreshing and delicious way to offer your body quality nutrition, but when there’s a laundry list of ingredients that require chopping, washing, and close measuring, some of the appeal dissipates. Here are eight of our favorite smoothies that keep things fresh and simple with five ingredients or less.

Photo: Lizzie Fuhr

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POPSUGAR Fitness

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Study found risk of painful headaches rose with

Scarring, allergic reactions and vision problems among possible side effects


WebMD Health

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Let’s not forget former gymnast Kacy Catanzaro’s impressive performance last month on the reality show America Ninja Warrior, where she made history by becoming the first woman to complete the arduous qualifier obstacle course. Next up: Kacy competes in the US finals in episodes that start to air on Monday, Aug. 18. In the meantime, we wanted to know Kacy’s secret to completing a course that has stumped countless muscled men and women before her, so we asked her to share her favorite training tips. Whether you’re training for a Mud Run or marathon, Kacy’s advice will surely help you snag your own personal record.

Wake up, work out: “The longer that the day goes on, the more you wish you had already worked out,” Kacy says. “You always have to get that strength training in to keep your body at where it needs to be and able to do those extra things.” That’s why she strength trains in the morning as soon as she (and boyfriend/coach Brent Steffensen) wake up. Of course, they don’t stop there: in the evening the duo fits in another workout by practicing obstacles or going rock climbing.

No equipment necessary: One look at Kacy and it’s obvious that she’s a lean mean machine, which she attributes to her equipment-free circuit training. “Our workouts are all bodyweight workouts,” she says. ” Our goal is to be as light and lean as possible and as strong as you can be. We do lots of different kinds of pull-ups: strict pull-ups, neutral pull-ups, wide-arm pull-ups, which really get your back.” Other favorite muscle-sculpting moves for Kacy and Brent are handstand push-ups and hanging TRX rows.

Speak it: “No matter what people might think, talk to yourself whenever something is going on, because when you say something out loud it’s different than just being inside your own head,” Kacy says. “If I feel like I’m inside my head too much, instead of fighting back and forth that way, I just talk, and I’m like, ‘OK. No. Push that away. Bring some positive thoughts in.’ And it does help get over those negative thoughts.”

Make small goals: Signing up for a big challenge may seem daunting, which is why Kacy takes it one day at a time. “Make sure you make little goals on the way,” she advises. “Obviously nobody reaches their goal as quickly as they would like to and you can get discouraged. If you have this huge goal that seems out of reach for you and you’re only half really believing you can get there it’s really going to hinder your journey there.” Instead, Kacy recommends counting progress in smaller increments, like adding one more push-up to your set or meeting a daily or weekly goal.

Believe in yourself: It wasn’t luck that got Kacy up the wall at to the final buzzer – despite many people not believing that a woman could ever complete the course, she knew that she could. “I wanted to do it for myself to prove that I could do it, but also for other women showing them, ‘Hey, this isn’t impossible. You can do it, too,’” she explains. “You have to believe in yourself. Because if you come in and you’ve worked hard but you don’t believe that you’re going to get to the top, you’re not going to.”

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Flublok easier to produce quickly and in large

Volunteers developed antibodies to chikungunya in first human trial, but shot for public use 5 years away, researcher says


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If there’s one word that describes life as a 20-something, it would have to be “busy.” Between work, friends, family, and the gym, it’s tough for me to find a second to myself. Don’t get me wrong – I love spending time with other people, but there are some things I just prefer to do alone. While happy hours and brunches are way worse when it’s a party of one, running is something that is just easier to enjoy when I’m flying solo.

I’ve tried breaking a sweat with my friends and even my boyfriend on occasion, but at the end of the day, I’ve come to treasure the time when I’m alone with my music and the road in front of me. Sure, there may be other arguments for or against having running buddies, but for me, it’s all come down to six reasons why I would rather just run on my own. Whether you prefer to run as a team of one or to head out with your best friends by your side, these ideas may inspire you to shake up your routine.

1. You can take “me” time

After a long week at work, there’s nothing quite as cathartic as a long run outside. The stress of life seems to just fall away as I hit the pavement. Getting moving is one of the only times of the week I really get Zen time for myself, and I treasure it.

2. You can go with the flow

I love to run, but I’ve learned that setting an exact distance just doesn’t work for me. Some days, I plan on heading out for half an hour only to find I am ready to run forever; other days, from the minute I start, I’m just ready for my run to end. When I’m on my own, it feels so much easier to just listen to how my body feels: there is no pressure to do something I’m not crazy about.

3. You can skip the side conversation

Yes, it’s important to make time in my calendar for my friends, but I’ve found that a running date just isn’t the right situation. For me, the temptation of a full-on catch-up session is too distracting, and I know I can’t focus on making the most of my sweat session. Instead of slowing myself down, I would rather pump out an amazing run and meet my girlfriends for cocktails afterward.

4. You can jam out

For me, the secret to an amazing workout is great music. Rocking out on a run is the best source of motivation and inspiration, plus it keeps me from getting bored. Popping in my headphones while running with a friend seems a little mean (I don’t want to ignore her!), so it’s easier to just jog and jam out on my own.

5. You can set your speed

It’s always awkward to start a jog with someone – how do you set the pace? Inevitably one person will be faster or slower than the other, and if you’re trying for something more than a casual jog, it can be tough to get on the same page. If I do want to get in a little exercise with friends, I would rather walk it out and save the run for when I’m on my own.

6. You can avoid unhealthy competition

I admit it: I’m competitive – and while it may not be totally healthy, being totally outpaced has managed to ruin a great workout. I’m proud of my strength and endurance, but once I ran with a buddy who managed to kick my butt despite being a couch potato. As I huffed and puffed up the first hill, they waited at the top, stretching. Instead of feeling challenged or inspired, I wound up spending the rest of the run feeling defeated and ready to cry. I’ve learned that, to keep my emotions out of my runs, the simplest solution is to be my own best competition, racing against my own times instead of other people.

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